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The highlight of the culinary year, here in sleepy Godalming, is not the 2 for Tuesday deal at Dominos (pretty much the only takeout in the whole town) but the Godalming Food Festival, held in the town centre in July. Whilst not quite the same as Taste of London, it was nonetheless a nice event with a number of nice stalls to sample some local food (and not so local) food and drink.

Godalming is a very pretty town in Surrey and even appeared in the film the holiday (ashamed to say I have seen it). The Food Festival took up most of the town

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Complete with Brass Band to bring a bit of style to the event

IMG_0433First stop was at a coffee stall for the company Redber. Redber are a local company with their own roaster, who are sourcing and roasting some great coffee beans from around the world. They were selling beans, as well as Coldbrew coffee (told you it was the next big thing) in Urn’s. After a long chat with the guys here, we waled off with a bottle of the Guatemalan Coldbrew, which is the best I have tasted, slightly sweet but with a deep coffee taste – its so great. These guys only do small batches of coffee and sell to a few shops or online, well worth checking out (Site).

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After dragging myself away from this stall it was on to sample some food. There is a pretty good range of food to eat at the Festival, from Bratwurst to Paella, to Thai BBQ and of course a Hog Roast

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I took on a Bratwurst, a couple of freshly BBQ’ed skewers with Satay sauce and a very disappointing giant Arrancini ball, which was too dry to eat,

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But the highlight was something that I had not tried before from the Indian stall and that was called Idli and Sambar. Idli’s are small round pancakes made from lentils and rice, they are light and fluffy, not much flavour but they satisfyingly melt in the mouth.

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These are traditionally served with a thick vegetable stew called Sambar, made with Tamarind. This was rich, well spiced and worked so well with the light crumbly Idli. It was great to try something new and not something you see in the UK usually. A real highlight of the day.

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After gorging on lots of streetfood, it was time for as bit of shopping. We picked up a few herbs (including Tarragon – my favourite) to be planted in the garden

and we also came across this stall selling the 1st available Peruvian cooking sauce in the UK. A company called Capsicana 

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We got chatting to Ben, the guy who was selling the product (and I promised i would mention him on my blog – didn’t get anything free though!). A really nice guy, very passionate about the products he was selling, he had this and a brazilian sauce to be used on meat or fish.

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We picked up the Peruvian sauce, which I used when I cooked some salmon fillets. It was really good, quite salty, although I salted the fish myself sa well, which definitely wasn’t needed! But a different sauce, fragrant, fruity and with a real kick, it was very summery and fresh. Peruvian food is on the up and up with great places like Lima opening up in London (well worth a trip if you can) and it seems that doing this at home is also something we will be doing soon.

So shopping completed we then met our friends at the Beer tent (outside my favourite pub – the Star) and tucked into a few nice beers,

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as usual I took on the US style Pale Ale, which was nice and hoppy – a good way to finish a nice sunny day eating and drinking – doesn’t get much better than that!

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